1. Getting a tattoo; does it hurt ?
  2. What about anaesthetics ?
  3. Why do I want a tattoo ?
  4. Religious arguments
  5. Can I get infectious diseases from tattoo needles?
  6. Are there any medical conditions that will prevent me from getting a tattoo?
  7. Can my tattoo get infected?
  8. How do i care for my new tattoo?
  9. Can a tattoo be removed?


  1. Getting a tattoo; does it hurt ?
    Yes. But, it's not as bad as what you might have in mind. The pain comes from the cluster of needles on the tattooing machine piercing your skin very rapidly. This sensation, however, doesn't feel like the poking pain of an injection; it's more of a constant vibration. You will be amazed at how quickly your body releases endorphins (pain killers), which relieves the pain significantly.

    The pain will also vary according to where on your body you get worked on. Skin right above bones (collarbone, anklebone, etc.) tend to be more painful than other areas. In addition, certain types of needles seem to hurt more than others.

    And always remember, you are volunteering for the experience. The amount of pain will also depend on your psychological attitude.

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  2. What about anaesthetics ?
    Some people say that taking a couple of over-the-counter analgesics before tattooing can take the edge off the pain. Acetaminophen, commonly sold under the brand name 'Tylenol' is generally recommended, but NOT aspirin, ibuprofen, or other NSAIDs, as they tend to inhibit clotting. Applying anaesthetic will also make your skin harder to absorb the tattoo inks.

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  3. Why do I want a tattoo ?
    People get tattoos for different reasons. Is it to please your partner? Is it because you want to belong to a group that has tattoos? Do you identify with a certain subculture known for tattoos? Do you want to show your independence, individuality or uniqueness?

    These are all valid reasons, and why many people get tattooed. However, because your tattoo is going to be permanent, try looking at yourself in 5, 10, or even 20 years. What will you be doing at that time? Will others look at your tattoo in a bad way? Just think about it.

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  4. Religious arguments
    Religious arguments here refers to Christianity.
    A word to the religious: In Leviticus 19:28, it says not to tattoo "I am the Lord" on you (i.e. don't take the name of the Lord in vain). It does NOT say you can't tattoo yourself at all, and it does NOT say there's anything wrong about piercing. What it DOES say is that it prohibits mutilating yourself for the dead, which was a senseless practice at that time. But for Christians, they are no longer bound by the Law. Remember that it's not what you do; it's what's in your heart when you do it.

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  5. Can I get infectious diseases from tattoo needles?
    There has been some concern regarding transmittable diseases such as Hepatitis-B and AIDS [HIV] linking to tattoo shops. But, as long as the area is strictly sanitized, your chances for infection will be greatly reduced.

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  6. Are there any medical conditions that will prevent me from getting a tattoo?
    It is always best to let the artist know if you have any medical condition, such as diabetes or epilepsy, in case of an emergency. If you have multiple allergies, you can always have the artist do a "patch test" on you with the colors you want and then later, return for a regular tattoo.

    Also, it is generally a bad idea to tattoo pregnant women.

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  7. Can my tattoo get infected?
    Not as long as you take care of your new tattoo. Some people have trouble healing tattoos with colors they are allergic to. If it gets infected and refuses to heal after a few days of using a topical antibiotic, you may want to pay a visit to a doctor. Keep in mind this only applies if you are a healthy individual without any condition that affects your immune system.

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  8. How do i care for my new tattoo?
    1. Keep the bandage on the tattoo for at least 2 hours after the work is complete.
    2. When the bandage is removed, wash the area gently with soap or water. DO NOT REBANDAGE after this.
    3. Dab an over-the-counter antibiotic ointment (like Neosporin) on the cleaned area. Do not use an ointment that contains zinc as it may cause an adverse reaction.
    4. Continue to lightly apply antibiotic ointment to your tattooed skin for the first few days, then switch to a plain skin lotion that DOES NOT CONTAIN dye, perfume, lanolin, Vitamin E, aloe or alcohol.
    5. Expose your healing skin to air as much as possible, but avoid prolonged exposure to the sun. The sun's ultraviolet rays can fade and damage a brilliant tattoo very fast.
    6. DO NOT SCRATCH the skin, no matter how much it itches.
    7. Wear clean, loose and comfortable clothing over the tattooed area. Your skin should heal in about 2 weeks.

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  9. Can a tattoo be removed?
    There are several excellent methods of tattoo removal available today. However with all of these methods, you will end up with a scar. It is much easier to get a tattoo in the first place than to get rid of one.
    • Tissue expansion
      This method is popular for removing smaller tattoos, where a balloon is inserted and inflated under the skin to slowly stretch the flesh. The tattoo is then cut out and the newly stretched skin covers its place. Will leave only a straight-line surgical scar.
    • Sal Abrasion
      Rubbing the image with salt and sanding it out.
    • Excision
      Cuts the image out, a small portion at a time.
    • Medical lasers
      Laser tattoo removal usually requires a number of visits, with each procedure lasting only a few minutes. It can be uncomfortable and does feel a lot like getting a tattoo on. The entire process usually takes several months.

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